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ONAP Honolulu brings cloud native functionality with seamless configuration of Helm based CNFs and K8s resources. Increased modularity allows users to pick and choose the components they need for their specific use case. Honolulu also brings increased support for the O-RAN A1 standard that provides a flexible way for RAN operators to optimize wide area RAN networks and reduce CAPEX. Significant new functionality was added around end-to-end 5G network slicing with three network slicing components for RAN, core, and transport and better compliance with 3GPP standards. The Honolulu Release will contain enhancements of 3 Use Cases (CCVPN, 5G SON and E2E Network Slicing), 8 Features, 4 Specs, 4 Best practices and 2 Global requirements. ONAP is applicable across several verticals, including enterprise, and is being positioned as a key component of the 5G Super Blueprint; setting the stage for the capability to orchestrate, manage, and automate across the networking stack.

Overview

Over 200 developers from 30 organizations collaborated to produce Honolulu, the eighth release of the Linux Foundation ONAP project. Honolulu furthers ONAP’s position as a comprehensive platform for orchestration, management, and automation of network and edge computing services for network operators, cloud providers, and enterprises.

Honolulu brings cloud native functionality with seamless configuration of Helm based CNFs and K8s resources. This new functionality includes health checks and is implemented in the Controller Design Studio (CDS) and Multi-Cloud projects. An ONAP cloud native task force meets regularly to explore deeper cloud native integrations. In addition to cloud native, modularity is an important topic in ONAP to allow users to pick and choose the components they need for their specific use case. The release includes increased modularity with simplified DCAE microservice deployment via Helm charts and includes a new KPI microservice and improved compliance with 3GPP, O-RAN, and ETSI through VES 7.2.1 alignment and supporting Network Function packages and service descriptors that are compliant with ETSI SOL004 and SOL007 specifications. Honolulu brings increased support for the O-RAN A1 standard that provides a flexible way for RAN operators to optimize wide area RAN networks and reduce CAPEX with significant new capabilities for end-to-end 5G network slicing with three network slicing components for RAN, core, and transport. The Honolulu Release will contain enhancements of 3 Use Cases (CCVPN, 5G SON and E2E Network Slicing), 8 Features, 4 Specs, 4 Best practices and 2 Global requirements.

5G and RAN integration are also key focus areas for Honolulu. Increased support for the O-RAN A1 standard that is implemented in the CCSDK and SDN-C projects providing a flexible way for RAN operators to manage wide area RAN network optimization reducing capex investment needs. Further integration improves integration with both O-RAN and 3GPP. There is a significant set of new functionalities around end-to-end 5G network slicing in the Honolulu release, including three components for RAN, core, and transport domains. Another key 5G related initiative is the new module, Configuration Persistence Service (CPS), that allows ONAP projects to store persistent state defined by YANG models, deploy YANG models at runtime, and share access to configuration management data.

ONAP is applicable across several verticals, including enterprise. An ONAP enterprise task force has been established to further explore ONAP’s unique capabilities for enterprise networks. ONAP is also being positioned as a key component of the new 5G Super Blueprint initiative, setting the stage for the capability to orchestrate, manage, and automate across the networking stack.

Honolulu is the first release to follow the new release cadence that will allow for more frequent releases, up to three times a year. The next ONAP release planned for 2H of 2021 is Istanbul. In addition to previous themes i.e. E2E Network Slicing and O-RAN/ONAP Alignment, Istanbul will officialize some Control Loop features, explore intent-based networking, and more.

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